What database to use.
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  #1  
Old 04-17-2012, 12:58 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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Default What database to use.


I've decided to dabble a little with making a database,
so that i can gain more experience with using VB 2010.

I started out by finding some code that created a ADO(ADOX)
database. I then was searching around on how to create tables
and records for it, but then i read a piece of information that
said that a DAO database is far better to use than a ADO
database, so i scaped the ADO project and created a DAO one.

I got as far as creating a database with code and while searching
for how to add tables and records, i ran across some information
that said that microsoft doesn't even recommend using DAO
any more. They are suppose to be abandoning the access database
and probably going to use SQL.

VB, no matter what versions there are out there, only support
DAO, starting from 1992 db version 1 and ending at 2000 db version
4. I know that is and access 2010 version that MS made but apparently
VB.net wasn't good enough to be able to use that version. At least i
don't think VB 2010 has that particular version in there com objects.

So any way, before i go any further with this, i'd like your opinions
on what database i should be using.

I don't plan on using a database on the internet, so that should leave
out SQL. My plan was to create a database that could handle image
data, like pngs and store it and be able to retrieve it and put it in a
picturebox when called on.

I know Your going to say not to do it. I've read that a lot during my
searches online. It probably won't hold more than 10 pngs at a time
but it will also need to hold string data and numeric data. It shouldn't
get to inflated.

Is there a good database that i can make for doing this with?
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
I started out by finding some code that created a ADO(ADOX)
database. I then was searching around on how to create tables
and records for it, but then i read a piece of information that
said that a DAO database is far better to use than a ADO
database, so i scaped the ADO project and created a DAO one.
Both DAO (Data Access Objects) and ADO (ActiveX Data Objects) are frameworks / libraries for accessing databases, they aren't databases themselves.

Both can be used to access a range of databases including Access or SQL.

Quote:
VB, no matter what versions there are out there, only support
DAO, starting from 1992 db version 1 and ending at 2000 db version
4. I know that is and access 2010 version that MS made but apparently
VB.net wasn't good enough to be able to use that version. At least i
don't think VB 2010 has that particular version in there com objects.
VB certainly isn't limited to DAO, VB has supported ADO from version 4 so the choice of VB isn't going to influence this decision in any way.

Quote:
I don't plan on using a database on the internet, so that should leave
out SQL.
SQL server has nothing specific to do with the internet, it can certainly be accessed from a web application but there is no requirement to do so. SQL Server is perfectly suited to being accessed from any valid client - be it windows, web or other.
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  #3  
Old 04-17-2012, 07:37 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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So, what are you saying? That i should just use the one that i'm
most comfortable using?

Looking for source code to see how things work, sure is a job in
itself. I've been looking for source code to create a db first and i
found it and used it.

Then i looked around for code to create tables and there is very little
code out there, showing how this is done. If i happen to find some,
then the coding for for SQL.

Why can someone make a program that demonstrates all the needed
aspects of creating a database?

I learned something today. There really aren't that many good programmers
out there on the web. Most of what i found were people asking the same
questions as me and anyone that responded to their questions wrote a
bunch of spaghetti code, thinking they were a programmer.

I tried a lot of that code and i always had errors.

My eyeballs hurt so bad from2 days of solid searching that i have to quit
for a while. I need the rest. LOL

Even Google wasn't my friend.
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  #4  
Old 04-17-2012, 08:34 PM
TheProfessor TheProfessor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VB_Alien View Post
So, what are you saying? That i should just use the one that i'm
most comfortable using?

Looking for source code to see how things work, sure is a job in
itself. I've been looking for source code to create a db first and i
found it and used it.

Then i looked around for code to create tables and there is very little
code out there, showing how this is done. If i happen to find some,
then the coding for for SQL.
Most programming languages don't have code to create tables or a database. You need to learn SQL in order to create databases.

You want to pick the relational database you want to use. Once you've picked your RDBMS, read up on SQL for that RDBMS. SQL is standardized, but most databases have their own ways of doing some things. SQL is how you will create databases and tables, insert, modify and delete data through your code.

Once you have your database set up, you can connect to it using a ConnectionString. A connectionString is basically a list of data that tells your program everything it needs to access your database, like the type of database, location of database, security, etc. Google would be your best bet once you determine what relational database management system you'll use.
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  #5  
Old 04-18-2012, 01:51 AM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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I found some code using ADO that creates a DB. creates a table and adds
four fields to it.

Now i'd like to be able to open that DB and see if the table and fields are
really there before i go any further.

For now, i'd rather stick with DAO and ADO. SQL just seems like over kill
for the little DB that i want to make.
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  #6  
Old 04-18-2012, 07:17 AM
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If your programming in .NET then you should try and use it.

If SQL is overkill then you shouldn't be trying to use databases. Unless you specifically mean Microsoft SQL Server, but then that's by the by because the particular database type doesn't make a great deal of difference to the code that is written, only the types that are used.

For example, if I want to connect to an Microsoft SQL database I'd connect via a System.Data.SQLClient.SQLConnection, or if I wanted to connect to an SQLite database I'd connect via a System.Data.SQLite.SQLiteConnection. But both connection objects are based around the System.Data.Common.IDbConnection interface so as far as actually using them in code THEY ARE EXACTLY THE SAME. As are commands, dataadapters, datareaders etc.

The point being that if you can program for a Microsoft SQL Server then you can program for pretty much any database type (as long as the .NET provider is... err.. provided). It's all the same.

Therefore, it's probably worth learning.

My answer to the question of the thread would be SQLite.
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  #7  
Old 04-18-2012, 12:58 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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I found a way to read the table and fields and found
out that all the code did was to create the database.

I'm surprised that i didn't get any errors when creating
the table and fields, which apparently, i didn't.

I'm so sick of trying to create an ADO or DAO database.
There just isn't enough information out there that covers
these things for VB Express 2010.

I did run across something though about SQL that i hope
you can clear up for me.

I read that any version of VB Express, can not create an SQL
database, unless i do it in design mode, but then the database
is stuck inside the program that i would make with it. Is that true?

I'd rather create the database, with it being in a folder somewhere
outside of the VB environment. Is there a trick to doing this?
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  #8  
Old 04-18-2012, 02:32 PM
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Not really sure what you mean by
Quote:
I'm so sick of trying to create an ADO or DAO database.
as there is no such thing as an ADO or a DAO database, those are just two technologies for accessing a database.

If you are considering SQL then http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/e...s/express.aspx gives access to the free Express edition, you can also download the management tools from there which will allow you to create and manage databases. These databases can then be accessed from a VB application without any problem at all.
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  #9  
Old 04-18-2012, 08:02 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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PlausiblyDamp:

I never really got into working with databases when i used VB6, so
i really don't know what the difference between DAO & ADO are.
I do know that everyone codes it differently though. It would seem
though that VB.Net requires a slightly different way to code for a
database and there lies my problem. Everyone is using ADO to
open a mdb file, that i thought was made by a DAO database code.
Then i find SQL opening up mdb files and then i really get confused.
If SQL can create, open and edit, all the databases created by DAO &
ADO, then maybe i should just learn SQL, to be on top of the game.

Anyway, I installed MySQL, just to give it a try but i'm not understanding
how to create or connect to a database. I have some SQL code that is suppose
to create a database, if it doesn't exits or open it, if it does exist. The problem
i don't understand is how to point the code toward a database on my hard drive
instead of an online database. Can someone help me with this? Here is the code.

Code:
 ' This is where i want to store a database file  C:\Users\MyName\Desktop\Passwords.mdb
Dim strConnect As String = "Server=localhost; Port=3306; User=user; Password=password"
Dim db As New MySqlConnection(strConnect)
Dim SQLQuery As String = ""
Dim cmd As MySqlCommand

'check database and table exists, create if not
db.Open()

SQLQuery = "CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS dbtest; "
SQLQuery &= "USE dbtest; "
SQLQuery &= "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Tracks (ID int not null _ 
primary key auto_increment,  " & ListView1.Columns(0).Text & " varchar(60), _
" &  ListView1.Columns(1).Text & " varchar(60),  " & ListView1.Columns(2).Text  _
& " varchar(60),  " & ListView1.Columns(3).Text & " varchar(60),  " _
& ListView1.Columns(4).Text _& " varchar(60));"

cmd = New MySqlCommand(SQLQuery, db)
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery()

'insert data
For Each ListItem As ListViewItem In ListView1.Items

SQLQuery = "INSERT INTO tracks(" & ListView1.Columns(0).Text & ", " _
& ListView1.Columns(1).Text & ", " & ListView1.Columns(2).Text & ", " _
& ListView1.Columns(3).Text & ", " & ListView1.Columns(4).Text & "), _
VALUES (@" & ListView1.Columns(0).Text & ", @" & ListView1.Columns(1).Text  _
& ", @" & ListView1.Columns(2).Text & ", @" & ListView1.Columns(3).Text & ", @" _
& ListView1.Columns(4).Text & ");"

cmd = New MySqlCommand(SQLQuery, db)
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text ' <-- What is the command to enter here?

cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" & ListView1.Columns(0).Text, ListItem.Text)
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" & ListView1.Columns(1).Text, ListItem.SubItems(1).Text)
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" & ListView1.Columns(2).Text, ListItem.SubItems(2).Text)
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" & ListView1.Columns(3).Text, ListItem.SubItems(3).Text)
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" & ListView1.Columns(4).Text, ListItem.SubItems(4).Text)

cmd.ExecuteNonQuery()

Next

Last edited by VB_Alien; 04-18-2012 at 08:14 PM.
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  #10  
Old 04-19-2012, 02:42 AM
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For starters you are using a MySqlConnection (used for connecting to a MySql database) but the comment indicates you are using an Access .mdb file. If it is an Access file then just use an OleDbConnection with a connection string (http://www.connectionstrings.com/access-2007 for examples) that points to the location of the access mdb file.
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  #11  
Old 04-19-2012, 07:47 AM
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There's two different scenarios being talked about here.

There's the administration of tables, such as creating them, changing the fields of the table etc and then there's using them, such as querying them, adding rows etc.

The vast majority of programs that people will write will just deal with using the tables. You write a program that queries the data in the database and makes changes to it.

You very rarely have to bother writing the administration stuff. As soon as anything on that side of it changes then whatever uses the database changes (i.e. you delete a table from a database, none of the code that queries that table works).

Generally speaking there's dedicated programs for the administration side. For Microsoft SQL Server you have the SQL Management Studio that lets you create databases, create tables in the database, edit fields in the table etc.

And at the end of the day, most of that administration stuff is just an SQL statement run against the database anyway, so it's more about understanding the syntax of the SQL to do the job in hand if you really wanted to do the code for it, but then a tool has already been created to make it easier so it makes sense to use that instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. But, ultimately, you'll be able to download a tool that will let you create the database you need easily and then you can get on with the code to start using it.

Again, SQLite is the best choice for a simple system, mainly because it doesn't require a database server to work.

You google for "SQLite management" or something like that and you'll find a tool that will let you create the database and tables.

Then you just crack on with writing the code to use that database.
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:02 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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After all the bickering about what database language to use and then me finally
trying to give SQL a chance, are you now saying that SQL can not create a database
or are you just saying that it's a lot easier to have a program, already made, to create
the database for me? I agree but i was wanting to learn to make one from scratch.

Anyway, i thought i had better stick with what MS supplies for using SQL but i don't
know if i referenced the correct object to use.

I referenced an MS ActiveX object and about the class form i put this: "Imports System.Data.SqlClient"
Is that correct?

I did download SQLite and already had it installed and i'll go now and download SQLite management.

When i add a reference to sql though, am i suppose to reference an MS ActiveX Object and the
above the class form put this: "Imports System.Data.SqlClient"?

Thank-you
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Old 04-19-2012, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
I referenced an MS ActiveX object and about the class form i put this: "Imports System.Data.SqlClient"
Is that correct?
If you are using .Net then the data access functionality will be found under System.Data.<something>, the code under System.Data.SqlClient is used to access Microsoft Sql Server.

MS ActiveX Data Objects are the older ADO based data access techniques and aren't needed under .Net (apart from legacy compatibility) and don't need to be referenced.

Quote:
I did download SQLite and already had it installed and i'll go now and download SQLite management.
If you are going to use SQLite then http://system.data.sqlite.org/index....www/index.wiki is the relevant .Net page for downloads. Is there a reason why you chose Sqlite over Sql Express?
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Old 04-19-2012, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Is there a reason why you chose Sqlite over Sql Express?
Nope. None at all. Chalk it up to "I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I'M DOING".

I'm only doing what others are telling me to do, or i wouldn't know what
to even look for. I'll go check out the Sql Express site.

Maybe because i'm using "Imports System.Data.SqlClient ", is the reason
why i'm getting an error then. I'll see what i else i can try and use.

Thanks....
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Old 04-19-2012, 08:45 PM
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Is SQL Server 2012 the correct program to get?
It gives me five choices of something to download.

1: Local DB
2: Express (Database Only)
3: Express with tools
4: SQL Server Management Studio Express
5: Express with Advanced Services

Got any idea on which one to get?

Come to think of it, i think i came here
already and tried to download option three
but it took about an hour and a half to
download just 14 percent, so i canceled the download.
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:59 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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How could this connect string be changed, to point toward
a database on my pc?

connetionString = "Data Source=ServerName;Initial Catalog=DatabaseName;User ID=UserName;Password=Password"

I won't need the server name, unless i have to put localDb in it's place.
I don't know what the initial catalog is.
Database name could be C:\Photo.mdf
Database isn't password protected, so i won't need a password or user name
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Old 04-20-2012, 02:46 AM
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All you should need to download is 2 and 4. The SQL Express database server and the management studio.

After installing SQL Express with the defaults, you should be able to connect to a database you've created with the connection string...

connetionString = "Data Source=YourPCName\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=TheDatabaseYouveCreated"

After installing database server and the management studio, run the management studio and the first thing it will ask for is what to connect to. It should have YourPCName\SQLExpress in the server name field. Whatever you connect to there is the same as the Data Source in your connection string. It will also have the authentication mode to select. You should be able to leave this on Windows Authentication and it will connect using your Windows login to authenticate against the SQL Server. To use Windows Mode authentication you don't specify a username and password in the connection string. Alternatively you can set up users in SQL Server and change the authentication mode to SQL Server and then you can supply a username and password to connect. It's those usernames and passwords that you would specify in the connection string.

By default the server will be installed to only work on Windows Authentication mode. You have to change a setting if you want to allow SQL usernames and passwords to connect. Selecting the properties of the Server, the Security page has that setting.

Once connected to SQL Server the first task will be to create a Database to start putting tables in. Under the Server is a Databases catagory. Expand this and you'll have a couple of other catagories, but no actual databases of your own. So you can right click the Databases and choose "New database...". A new window opens up with various bit and bobs but all you really need to do is give you database a name and click OK. Whatever you enter there as the Database Name is what you put as the Initial Catalogue in the connection string. You can create more than one database in the server.

With the database created, you'll now need to put some tables into the database to use. Under Databases should now be the Database Name you just created. Expand that and one of the groups is Tables. Right click Tables and choose "New Table...". Now you start putting in your columns for the table, giving each column a Name, a Type and whether the field is allowed to be Null or not.

Note that if you right click in the fields pane then one of the menu options is "Generate Change Script". This will show you the SQL script that will create the fields you have specified if you want to learn more about the SQL scripts for creating tables.

You can right click a field or a selection of fields and set the Primary key of the table. You can set up Indexes for the table by right clicking and choosing "Indexes\Keys".

When you've created all your fields for the table, save it (File menu Save Table, right click the page's tab Save Table, close the page and it'll ask you if you want to save it). When saving it, if you haven't given it a name in the properties of the table on the right then it will prompt you for a name for the table. Give the table a name and you now have a Database to connect to and a Table in the database to use.

Hopefully you should now know the connection string to connect to that table and use it.
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Old 04-20-2012, 05:21 PM
VB_Alien VB_Alien is offline
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You didn't mention, what i'd be creating the database with. I've downloaded
and installed everything you suggested and i still haven't gotten any further.

I've used SQLite to create a database but it doesn't save in the mdf format or
any format at all. It just creates the name of the database with no extension

I did find a database online called AdventureWorks.mdf but i can't open that either.

I guess VB 2010 will do good enough to create mdf databases for now but i'd
still have the same problem.

I've got some sample code that is just suppose to open a connection to a database
so i'll post that to see if there is something wrong with the code.

Code:
Imports System
Imports System.Collections
Imports System.Data
Imports System.Data.SqlClient
Imports System.IO
Imports System.Xml.Serialization
Imports System.Xml
Imports System.Windows.Forms
Imports System.Data.OleDb

Private Sub OpenConnection()

Private DbPath As String = "C:\Users\MyPcName\Desktop\Employees"

Dim connetionString As String
        Dim cnn As SqlConnection
        connetionString = "Data Source=MyPcName\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=" & DbPath & ";Integrated Security=SSPI"

        cnn = New SqlConnection(connetionString)
        Try
            cnn.Open()
            MsgBox("Connection Open ! ")
            cnn.Close()
        Catch ex As Exception
            MsgBox("Can not open connection ! ")
        End Try
End Sub
I keep getting the "Can not open connection" message.

So, either my connection string is wrong or the database is bad or
in the wrong format.

This is sure a lot of trouble just to create and use a database. I have never
had this many problems with VB6.

I think the whole VB express project needs to be scrapped. It isn't
user friendly at all.
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:18 AM
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You would use the Express management studio to create the database, that wass one of the things DrPunk suggested you should download.

Why you are trying to use SQLite and expecting it to create a database for use with SQLExpress rather than using SQLExpress though is another matter.

http://www.connectionstrings.com is a great place for help with how connection strings work, the Initial Catalog parameter takes the name of the database and not a path to the database - that is probably why you are getting the error.
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Old 04-21-2012, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VB_Alien View Post
I think the whole VB express project needs to be scrapped. It isn't
user friendly at all.
In all honesty you are making this far more difficult than it needs to be - the entire process for creating a SQL database is pretty much
  1. Go to View menu
  2. Select server explorer
  3. In server explorer find the Data Connections node
  4. Right click this node and select "Create new SQL Server database"
  5. Name the database

In fact googling "create sql database vb express" gives the first link of http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/libr...v=sql.90).aspx which walks you through the entire process from start to finish.
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