VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question VB Requirements Question
VB Requirements Question
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  #1  
Old 08-28-2011, 09:34 AM
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Ilhan Ilhan is offline
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Default VB Requirements Question


Hey guys thanks for reading my thread again. Recently I have moved to vb10.net from vb8.net and I really enjoy it. Well I was working for like 2-3 months now on a calculator that does physic tasks (middle school level) and it works perfectly , the algorithm is now complete also the code is nearly optimized. Well here is my question:

What are the requirements for VB10 programs to run? I know it requires the 4.0 net framework instead of the 3.5 one I used for VB8 , but is there anything else that I should think of? Does VB have some libraries that get installed when I download VB it self?

Basically lets imagine a blank new operative system that has nothing beside system files on it (let it be Win7). Do I need anything installed beside 4.0 framework so the program runs?

Note 1: I didn't use even backgrounds pictures or such like. Everything on the interface was made with VB components.

Note 2: I have also used the Microsoft Script Controller 1.0 reference which I found in the COM components , does that change anything?

Hope I explained everything correctly and thanks in advance.

~Ilhan
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Old 08-28-2011, 10:20 AM
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I don't believe vb10.net "requires" the 4.0 net framework.
If you had a vb8.net program that you upgraded to vb10, vb10 is probably still targeting the 3.5 or 3.0 network for that project.

If Windows 7 is the target, the needed .net framework may already be included.
If you go through the publish process, the install should include the dependencies.
Since others are more knowledgable than I on this topic, I'll step aside, but I think this question should be in the Installation forum, so I'll move it there.
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Old 08-28-2011, 11:29 AM
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So basically I could build it as Release , install NET framework 4.0 (if it is not installed) on the OS and the program should run ?
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Old 08-28-2011, 04:32 PM
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The answer is sort of complicated.

First, you can't assume any version of .NET is installed. Vista came with 3.0 and 7 shipped with 3.5, but in both cases .NET was an optional package that could have been disabled by administrators/OEMs. Some people on the internet will tell you it's safe to assume .NET 2.0 or some other version is present; those people are wrong. *However*, odds are 99% of people will be able to run a 2.0 program.

With respect to what your program will take, it's also complicated. First, let's get naming out of the way with a brief history that illustrates why "VB 10 .NET" doesn't help us understand what you're doing.
  • Visual Studio .NET introduced a version publicly named "Visual Basic .NET". Internally, this was VB7, but no one called it that (particularly VB6 programmers.) This version only works against .NET 1.0. This was CLR 1.
  • Visual Studio 2003 introduced "Visual Basic 2003". Internally, this was still VB7; again no one used that name. This version works against .NET 1.1. This was a modified CLR 1.
  • Visual Studio 2005 introduced "Visual Basic 2005". This is VB8; no one but the VB dev team called it that. Since they re-introduced default instances here, no one listens to them anymore. It works against .NET 2.0. This was CLR 2.
  • Visual Studio 2008 introduced "Visual Basic 2008". This is VB9; no one calls it that except the dev team. It works against .NET 2.0, 3.0, or 3.5 depending on build settings. This was CLR 2.
  • Visual Studio 2010 introduced "Visual Basic 2010". This is VB10; no one calls it that except the dev team. It works against .NET 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0 depending on the build settings. This is CLR 3.
Key points: the public tends to refer to VB using the year of the Visual Studio version. Since VB 2008, it's also important to note which version of the framework the application was compiled against.

So if you're writing an application in VB 2010, there's 4 possible framework versions it could target. If the project was upgraded from VB 2008, odds are you were targeting .NET 3.5. If you meant VB8, you were using VB 2005 and could only target 2.0. You'll have to look in your project settings to figure out what version you are using, and that tells you which version you need.

I don't think it's safe to assume if the user has installed 4.0 a 3.5 application will work. Note how there are 3 different CLR versions in the history lesson? If you install 3.5, it installs CLR 2 which means 2.0, 3.0, and 3.5 applications will run, but not 1.0 or 1.1. I'm pretty sure installing 4.0 only installs CLR 3, so 2.0-3.5 applications won't run. (I think you can tweak to force them to run, but doing so risks undesired behavior.)

My recommendation? Switch to the .NET 4.0 client profile if you can. It's a subset of full 4.0 and from what I understand the installation is < 30MB. You can send users to http://smallestdotnet.com to get it.

With respect to the MS Script control, I have no clue. That's an external component and you'll have to search the internet or perform tests to determine if there's a dependency you have to distribute. It's possible it's a core windows component, and if that's the case you can assume it's there.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:19 AM
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Thanks a lot for the answer. Now I have quite a brighter picture of how all the net frameworks work. Thanks for the great tips both of you.
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