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  #1  
Old 04-18-2009, 05:30 PM
Joe_Dert Joe_Dert is offline
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Okay, so I'm trying to switch my rendering engine from GDI to DirectX...

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Edit: I finally found some info on doing this in a tutorial, it was written about using MDX from IronPython, but, it translated easily enough to VB code..

Basically it was on how to use the Sprite class to render images, I still don't fully understand it, like why does Draw2D have two sets of X, Y coordinates or why some images won't work, like .gif files, it seems to like .png images, but I did manage to get some sprites rendered, I just need to figure out how to better work with it..

On the plus side, it's amazingly fast rendering on the GPU, well, after working with GDI for so long that is, plus being able to use alpha blending will help a lot.. Not to mention being able to do other cool stuff, like use particle effects, etc,.. I think I'm going to like using it once I get the hang of it..

So, with all that in mind, if you can think of anything that might help me learn to better use direct3d and the sprite class for rendering, please post it, it would be very much appreciated.

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Edit2: Okay, so the first x, y are for the rotational pivot point... I see now..

Last edited by Joe_Dert; 04-18-2009 at 09:30 PM.
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Old 04-18-2009, 10:37 PM
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Two sets of x/y, probably upper left and lower right coordinates of spite..

In any event, MDX has been depreciated in favor of XNA.
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Old 04-18-2009, 11:35 PM
Joe_Dert Joe_Dert is offline
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In any event, MDX has been depreciated in favor of XNA.
Isn't XNA basically a DirectX wrapper class?

I know the Xbox can use XNA code, and the XBox is built on DirectX 9.0c, so it stands to reason that XNA is nothing but a wrapper for accessing DirectX functions, the only benefits would be easier porting between PC and XBox, and I'm guessing they might have made a few functions easier to use, ie, a few bells and whistles to make it seem more worthwhile..

Well, that's how I see it, but I could certainly be wrong..

Anyone care to list some benefits, disadvantages, things of that nature, I'm guessing it can handle graphics, audio, input, etc, if it's replacing DX, so how well do those components work compared to DirectSound, DirectInput, etc,.. Is it better documented than MDX, especially where VB.Net is concerned..

Just some firsthand info from users would be nice..

Last edited by Joe_Dert; 04-18-2009 at 11:43 PM.
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Old 04-19-2009, 01:15 AM
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MDX is also a DirectX wrapper class
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Old 04-19-2009, 03:21 AM
Joe_Dert Joe_Dert is offline
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MDX is also a DirectX wrapper class
Well, yeah, but what I was getting at, is that Microsoft owns XBox, XNA is XBox compatible, of course they want us to use it, more programmers using a library that can be deployed on either MS platform is obviously good for them.

So my concern is less about it being a wrapper, but that it's biggest selling point is XBox portability, which clearly benefits MS, though I guess if you want to go cross platform it's the way to go..

But me, I'm just making some little games, and what have you, mainly for fun. So whats the real pay off for using XNA? That's my concern, I spent the last month learning MDX, so getting me to switch now will require a bit of coercion..

Is it faster, better documented, easier to use, what do I get out of the deal?
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Old 04-19-2009, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe_Dert View Post
...Microsoft owns XBox, XNA is XBox compatible, of course they want us to use it, more programmers using a library that can be deployed on either MS platform is obviously good for them...

...but that it's biggest selling point is XBox portability, which clearly benefits MS, though I guess if you want to go cross platform it's the way to go...

...So whats the real pay off for using XNA? That's my concern, I spent the last month learning MDX, so getting me to switch now will require a bit of coercion...

Is it faster, better documented, easier to use, what do I get out of the deal?
The compelling reason not to use managed DirectX is that it's deprecated. That means you lose all hope of upgrading your games or applications to support cool new features of DX10 or upcoming versions.

Of course, DX9.0c has plenty of features and may be enough for you. There are a couple of pretty goox Managed DirectX books for VB.NET. I found a chapter from a book online in PDF format that sort of got me started working with sprites. I don't have it anymore though.

Take a look at this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Managed-Direct.../dp/0672325969
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Old 04-19-2009, 07:44 PM
Joe_Dert Joe_Dert is offline
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Originally Posted by darkforcesjedi View Post
The compelling reason not to use managed DirectX is that it's deprecated. That means you lose all hope of upgrading your games or applications to support cool new features of DX10 or upcoming versions.

Of course, DX9.0c has plenty of features and may be enough for you. There are a couple of pretty goox Managed DirectX books for VB.NET. I found a chapter from a book online in PDF format that sort of got me started working with sprites. I don't have it anymore though.

Take a look at this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Managed-Direct.../dp/0672325969
Well, alright, then that settles it, for now, I have no reason to move forward, I'm making a tile based engine, and as awesome as DX10 is, DX9.0c more than meets my needs, it's overkill in fact.

So that's really all I needed to hear on the subject, thank you very much.

Btw, off topic, but I wanted to thank you again for your help in my other topic, I use some of the stuff you showed me quite a bit now, like the List(of), and Dictionary(of) classes.. The "Using" method is pretty useful too,..

But I really like the two generic list types, I was using them other day for tracking missiles fired from a ship(space invader style), it made working with them easy. I've used them in my map class for my map editor(tracking grids, and tiles, etc,.), they are extremely useful for a variety of things.
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Old 04-19-2009, 08:32 PM
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The fact that its depreciated also means that compatability may end at any time. This is different from setting a specific end date.. that compatability with it is no longer a concern of theirs.

You can stick with MDX for now, but I highly suggest that your next project adopt XNA. Your MDX knowledge will eventualy be worthless.
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Old 04-20-2009, 01:17 AM
Joe_Dert Joe_Dert is offline
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Originally Posted by Rockoon View Post
The fact that its depreciated also means that compatability may end at any time. This is different from setting a specific end date.. that compatability with it is no longer a concern of theirs.

You can stick with MDX for now, but I highly suggest that your next project adopt XNA. Your MDX knowledge will eventualy be worthless.
I'll keep that in mind, but as for it being worthless, in a way, yes, but not really, experience is experience, so it may not be of any use at some point, but it's helping me learn to be a better programmer, so it has some value..

Anyways, thanks for all your replies..
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