Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:46 AM
surfR2911 surfR2911 is offline
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Default Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru


Is this thread "a little out there"?
Yes..probing to the edge of our galaxy and beyond!
(but mostly concentrated on computing stuff I promise..)

Post 1 (of 2)

I'm going to be talking about the PBS program I watched tonight about the Alma Observatory (and it's Correlator computer),
but first a recent link describe the world's fastest supercomputers.
If you go through all 1 pages you'll see that all of them are running Linux as an operating system
and none of them (AFAIK) use Managed .Net programming.

If you look at the Wikipedia page for "supercomputer", you'll see that it says:
Quote:
"High-performance computing" redirects here
However HPC not only stands for "High-performance computing" but also (sometimes) for "high performance cluster".
The Wikipedia page for that is the "computer cluster" page.

High performance clusters are really a Linux thing.
Here is an IBM HPC Part1 article that talks about Symmetric multiprocessors (SMP) and massively parallel processors (MPPs)..part2 is here.

Dell also has their HPCC, and HP offers a HPC Linux Value Pack.

Of course if you're waiting for Microsoft to come out with a Linux-based solution for High Performance Clusters you probably shouldn't be holding your breath. They do have a "New to HPC?" page (with Windows Azure banner/header) that talks about their Windows HPC Server.

So anyway you may have failed to see the Alma Correlator under the world's fastest supercomputers.

It's no slouch at 16 quadrillion (16,000,000,000,000,000) operations per second according to this NRAO page,
but it's kind of a specialized supercomputer for processing analog signals.

So maybe I should take a step back and explain that ALMA stands for "Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array"
Here's a few links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atacama...llimeter_Array

It's bee in development now for over a decade (since the late 90's)
and only recently has the array of 64 giant space telescopes been installed on site according to the PBS special I watched:
Into Deep Space: The Birth Of The Alma Observatory

I urge you to try and catch it on your local PBS station but just in case you can't, here's some other links:
http://www.netaonline.org/search/Pro...s.aspx?id=3797
http://www.pingryhdtv.com/project_in...est_space.html

YouTube: Alma Observatory
Has little sounds except for the wind whistling across the high Andes mountain Atacama plateau and the hum inside the technical building (see minute 7:45) of the AOS (Array Operations Site, elevation 16000 ft) at latitude: -23.029° ; longitude: -67.755°)
You'll find some other EOS site videos if you do a search.

The Alma Correlator uses thousands of processors and takes up many racks,
that look prettier in the dark --see attached pic (I couldn't link to it online).

Some other technical Alma related documents,
(which interested me though they may be to dry and technical for others):
(1, 2, 3 (pdf) , 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Attached Images
File Type: png alam_correlator_prettier_in_the_dark.png (196.4 KB, 7 views)

Last edited by surfR2911; 11-29-2012 at 07:26 AM.
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:49 AM
surfR2911 surfR2911 is offline
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Default Post 2 of 2:Alma Software (ACS, AIPS, CASA);a bit on MSIL, IDL, CORBA, SOAP & ICE

The software suite that Alma uses is called the Alma Common Software (ACS).

How did ACS come about?
Well first there was AIPS (Astronomical Image Processing System).
Then AIPS was developed into AIPS++.
Then at some point the CASA (Common Astronomy Software Applications) software package came along.
Then CASA became ended up with a "binding" to ACS per this old page.
There is still even a "AIPS-to-CASA Cheat Sheet".

Of course CASA only runs on Linux or the Mac O/S per this "Obtaining the CASA Release" page.

ACS, however is built on COBRA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture).
Haven't heard of that on the xvbt forum before?
We'll it was mentioned once, back in 2008 by "CodeASaurus Hex", Roger_Wgnr
in this post which says:
Quote:
Microsoft Interface Definition Language (MIDL) is analogous to Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA)
IDL as a language for specifying these interfaces.
It's also mentioned on this Microsoft Patterns and Practices "Integration Technologies" page -- in connection with
Distributed Object Integration (DOI) using object request broker (ORB).

According to this page:
Quote:
..it's not easy to connect CORBA to the .NET world
According to this MSDN blog article entitled, "Integrating CORBA and .NET applications":
Quote:
In general, you should build interop solutions using Web Services wherever possible.
This will give you a much cleaner integration architecture over time, across multiple projects. In many people's context, it means that you would take a service oriented architecture approach, and build reusable services out of your CORBA asset, which can be reused not just by the .NET component today, but by other client applications later on.

If this is not possible (due to whatever organizational reasons), then specifically for point to point CORBA integration, Janeva, JIntegra.NET or IIOP.NET are all fine. First two are commercial and well supported – last one is open source.
There is also another MSDN blog that discusses CORBA:
Quote:
CORBA is a core part of the Object Management Architecture (OMA), a complete infrastructure for distributed computing.

It was developed to merge remote procedure calls and object orientation to achieve support for distributed objects. The standard can be implemented with hardware, OS and programming language independence using the Interface Definition Language (IDL).

IDL is a purely declarative language to define interfaces to CORBA objects.
Some other links:
A brief tutorial on CORBA
The Rise and Fall of CORBA
http://www.omg.org/oma/
I guess I should also mention ICE (Internet Communications Engine) developed by ZeroC:
Quote:
It supports C++, Java, .NET-languages (such as C# or Visual Basic), Objective-C, Python, PHP and Ruby[1] on most major operating systems such as Linux, Solaris, Windows and Mac OS X. A light variant of ICE runtime, called Ice-e[2], may run inside mobile phones

ICE was influenced by CORBA in its design, and indeed was created by several influential CORBA developers.
However, it is much smaller and less complex than CORBA.
Ice compares favorably to SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), with its main advantage being that it's more object oriented.
Another major advantage is that it offers vastly superior performance in terms of both bandwidth and processor load.
This is because SOAP is based on HTTP and XML, requiring parsing, while Ice uses a binary protocol designed for high performance and low verbosity
Alright then..that's all I had time to research in the 50 some minutes the show lasted,
so I'll leave it there.

Last edited by surfR2911; 11-29-2012 at 07:05 AM.
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:16 PM
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dilettanteSupercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru dilettante is offline
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Both Microsoft and Apple alienated a lot of people when they teamed up to crush all competition in the early 1990s. They effectively managed to destroy all other desktop competition if we ignore Linux, a relative newcomer that came on the stage after those years.

While a lot of hooting about "open source" might lead you to think this was a big part of the divide that developed. I suspect those strong-arm duopoly years did a lot of damage though. Some of the players squeezed out were those Unix workstation vendors, dearly loved by the scientific and engineering communities.

In any case, here we are.

Outside of LOB-ware and Windows' share of the commodity computing market you tend to find a lot of C & C++, a lot of Java, and a lot of scripting languages and minority compiled languages. Heck, even Fortran is alive and well. But you won't find much C# there and the "Basic well" has been poisoned for a generation (VB, VB.Net, or any other flavor) - guilt by association.

Apple is looked on more favorably despite its earlier complicity. A share of that might be due to the move to a Unix-based OS a decade ago.
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Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
 
Supercomputer into deep space on the Chajnantor plateau of Peru
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