The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
The Official VB6 vs VB.NET Thread
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  #21  
Old 02-03-2005, 01:12 PM
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It's the code that you write when you program in VB.NET. Since that code is managed by the .NET Framework, it is called managed.

By the way, you could develop OCXs in VB6 and then use them in VB.NET, but using unmanaged libraries is not considered professional by expert VB.NET programmers.

Finally, remember that VB.NET executables are compiled in byte code, that is different from the PE code of VB6 EXE's. (and much easier to crack!)

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  #22  
Old 02-05-2005, 01:45 PM
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  #23  
Old 02-05-2005, 02:58 PM
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what is everyone's opinion on the fact that microsoft keeps comming out with a "new" version of .Net every year or so (2001, 2002, 2003, and soon 2005, I think these dates are correct).
This didnt happen with good 'ol VB6, or did it, I wouldnt know.

Maybe it is just me, but if and when I decide to shell out all that money for .Net, I want to know that I am getting a good version of it, not some stepping stone that microsoft decides to sell on it's path to perfecting .Net. In other words, lets say I bough it when it came out a couple years ago, well that is just too bad for me if I want the new/better features that now come standard with the current versions of .Net. is microsoft just going to keep modifing it for years to come, or when will they draw the line and say, "its good enough, now lets move in to create the next language to replace this".
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  #24  
Old 02-05-2005, 03:14 PM
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One of the great things about .NET is that it is completely free. When a new version of the framework comes out you can download the new version of the SDK and you will have the compiler(s). What you pay Microsoft for is the IDE (Visual Studio) and it is not necessary to build .NET programs.

It is very aggrivating that Microsoft has decided to make their IDE in such a way that it is tied so closely to the framework and not able to build programs that target other versions of .NET. They have successfully blurred the line between the IDE and the framework so much that people don't even realise what they are buying when they get Visual Studio and don't know that there are alternatives.
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  #25  
Old 02-05-2005, 04:03 PM
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OK, I think you said two diferent things there, let me see,

you say that one can just go and download the new version for free of the updates to the actualy framework/language? So if I had the oldest version, I could just go out, download the updates, and (for the most part), it would be as if I had just bought the latest version.

Microsoft has blurred the line between their IDE and the framework so that the diferent versions arent really the same, even if you get the updates?
does this mean that acutall there are major, unreconciable, diferences between the diferent versions that make each one diferent?

Also, what does the "framework" mean? because I think I am thinking of it in the wrong way. When I think of the framework, I think more of something that isnt going to change from verison to version, the actual language (syntax and whatnot), what it does, ...
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  #26  
Old 02-05-2005, 04:10 PM
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Being as you have an understanding of Java it is better to think of .NET the same way. Java has a virtual machine and .NET is somewhat similar. Think of the framework as the Java sdk. It is free and you can write programs for it with any text editor. That is the framework. You get the VB compiler (vbc.exe) and the C# compiler (csc.exe) free because they are installed with the framework. In Java you can pay Sun to get their Netbeans IDE and the same goes for .NET you can pay Microsoft for their IDE which they call Visual Studio. In Java there are other IDEs available and the same goes for .NET. Borland has one and there is even a completely free one called #develop.
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  #27  
Old 02-05-2005, 04:29 PM
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OK, that makes things alot clearer, thanks.
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  #28  
Old 02-05-2005, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John
It is very aggrivating that Microsoft has decided to make their IDE in such a way that it is tied so closely to the framework and not able to build programs that target other versions of .NET. They have successfully blurred the line between the IDE and the framework so much that people don't even realise what they are buying when they get Visual Studio and don't know that there are alternatives.
John, what do you mean here exactly? I would consider C# to be pretty .Net "agnostic", while C++ bounces in-and-out of managed code and VB.Net has its own special quirks like Optional Parameters and Properties that accept parameters...

In a sense, C# is the most restrictive (more restrictive than the CLR, actually), but the most neutral. I believe that anything written in C# should be accessible as-intended from the other languages. I think it's the other languages that have to be "C# aware" if they want their code to be more universally callable from other .Net languages.

But something tells me you didn't mean this? I'm not quite sure what you're getting at actually!
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  #29  
Old 02-05-2005, 06:58 PM
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What I'm getting at is not language specific at all. It is completely an argument against Visual Studio, which is nothing more than a fancy notepad designed to work with the .NET framework.

What I mean is that VB2k3 can't develop programs for the 2.0 framework or the 1.0 framework. It is dependent upon the 1.1 framework, and only the 1.1 framework. The only reason you need to buy a new version of Visual Studio is because you need to write programs for the new version of the .NET framework.

What happened to innovation? You no longer buy a new version of the IDE because it is better than the last version, you buy it instead because you want to use the new version of the framework, or language, both of which are completely free. So with 2K5 we have a gradient look to the IDE, which is quite frankly silly looking. Give me something new and innovative!

[/rant]
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  #30  
Old 02-05-2005, 07:17 PM
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Heh, ok, I see your point.

But they have to make money somehow... And, as you say, you can still use Notepad.exe.

The truth is that the IDE and not just the compiler have to be aware of the new features. In theory the old VS2k3 could handle the Framework 2.0 when it came out... Or could it? For example, you would get squiggly lines under all the new features like Operator overloading. Why? Because the old IDE would not have a clue what is going on, even if the compiler did know.

Even worse is the concept of debugging. Stepping through, I guess the extra NoOp codes are in the IL itself, etc, but the IDE still has to maintain breakpoints etc. I doubt that debugging features differ much from VS2k3 to VS2k5, but the point is that the IDE is way more than just a Compiler.

MSFT really has to develop the new compiler and the new IDE hand-in-hand. They are willing to give away the compiler for free, but they charge for the IDE. I don't really have a problem with this...

... And the 2005 Beta seems pretty awesome. (Cartoonish look notwithstanding! )
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  #31  
Old 02-05-2005, 07:29 PM
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I am getting a sense of, .Net is great, hurray hurray, but just dont buy anything from microsft to use it, just use the free stuff (unless you want the pretty interface). I did go and download all the framework and #develop IDE, and I must say, it isnt too bad as far a free solution goes.
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  #32  
Old 02-05-2005, 07:31 PM
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They have to make money somehow? Look at Windows. You can't buy a computer these days without buying Windows even if you want to use something else!

My point is more about the difference between the 1.1 framework and the 1.0 framework than it is the 1.1 and 2.0. There was a major step forward behind the scenes between the 1.1 and 2.0 (hence the 2). If I had to buy a new version of VS for each major version of the framework that would be one thing, but from 1.0 to 1.1 is nothing other than rediculous in my opinion.

I look at it this way, if I'm giving you money then you should be giving me something I don't already have. Selling the framework would be fine but don't give it to me for free and then tell me I have to give you money for something I don't need and make people like the users of this forum think they can't program without it.

If I wanted to pay for something I could get for free I'd use Linux!

Sorry for the rant, this is a sore spot with me and a place where I think MS is making a mistake!
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  #33  
Old 02-05-2005, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrjeffy321
I am getting a sense of, .Net is great, hurray hurray, but just dont buy anything from microsft to use it, just use the free stuff (unless you want the pretty interface). I did go and download all the framework and #develop IDE, and I must say, it isnt too bad as far a free solution goes.
Many people will tell you that the free alternatives are no good. Believe what you want and do whatever research you possibly can, and come up with your own evaluation.

If I wasn't paid to write programs, I'd have no other choice but to use the free alternatives. It is too expensive to do it any other way on what I make.
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  #34  
Old 02-07-2005, 05:59 PM
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Default newbie's question: how hard to convert VB6 code to VBDOT?

Because of a lot of reason, I choose VB6 for my present programming, but I am wondering what is the difference between VB6 and VBDOT? will it be hard to convert vb6 code to vbdot code?

Sorry if you think it is a idiot question, but I really need some idea, thanks!

Yanli
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  #35  
Old 02-07-2005, 06:22 PM
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you mean vb .net?
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  #36  
Old 02-07-2005, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illusionist
you mean vb .net?
Yeah, vb6 and vb.net, it is my question, thx and looking forward to more info.

Yanli
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  #37  
Old 02-07-2005, 06:25 PM
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Basically, you'll have to recreate it from scratch. From personal experience, the upgrade wizard doesn't do much to help at all.
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  #38  
Old 02-07-2005, 06:30 PM
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thanks a lot.

do you mean that VB6 and VB.NET are almost two different languages? what I learned now will not help me in the future to learn VB.NET?
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  #39  
Old 02-07-2005, 06:37 PM
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Pretty much. Basically (from what I've seen so far), the only thing that is similar would be the syntax and some of the code structures [ With .. End With, If .. Then .. Else, etc. ] .NET is OOP, so you'll have to relearn some of the most basic concepts all over again.


But, .NET is the future, so you might want to jump on the bandwagon if you want. Fortunately, .NET is free - what costs money is the IDE. SharpDevelop is a free IDE - you can Google for it.
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  #40  
Old 02-08-2005, 08:31 AM
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At the risk of offending all the #develop pundits here, I feel I have to offer the opinion of someone who felt much differently after using it for a while.

I'd just as soon code in notepad as #develop. It was crap.

I tried .Net with it, then decided to just forget it. I only took .Net back up after I'd saved enough to buy VS.Net.
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